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Tales From HPPR

Join High Plains Public Radio as they present Tales from HPPR - featuring Fairytales, Folktales, Tall-tales that nourish our imagination and maybe teach us important life lessons.


Tales from HPPR is a six-part radio series told by locals Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from
May 16-27 at 7:45 AM and 5:44 PM.
 

HPPR Fairy Tales & Folklore logo


Tune-in to your local HPPR station. In Amarillo, it is 105.7, or listen online at hppr.org.

Check out the full schedule and details for each story below:

 

Schedule

Hansel and Gretel Was A True Story And A Horrible Tragedy | by Linda Caroll  | History of Yesterday

Monday, May 16: Hansel and Gretel

A Fairy Tale told by Eric Barry, Chairman, City of Amarillo, Convention and Visitors Bureau, Arts Committee, Texas

Hansel and Gretel live with their parents at the edge of the forest. One day their mother sends them into the forest to look for strawberries. Their father comes home to find them missing, and warns his wife about the dangers of the witch in the forest. They set out in search of them. The children become lost and discover a Gingerbread House, which is the home of the Witch.

To find out what happened and to hear other “Tales from HPPR” tune in to High Plains Public Radio Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from May 16-27 at 7:45 AM and 5:44 PM or listen online at hppr.org.


Dance of the Sacred Bird

Wednesday, May 18: Turkey Girl

A Zuni Folk Tale told by Deana Craighead, Curator of Art, Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum, Canyon, Texas

Long ago on the plains around Thunder Mountain, there lived a very poor girl who was in charge of a turkey herd.  She was very kind to her herd and they would come whenever she called.

One day she heard about a festival - the Dance of the Sacred Bird – which would take place in four days.

She wanted to go but felt it was impossible. So, as she went about with her turkeys through the day, she would talk to them, though she never dreamed that they understood a word of what she was saying. But they did understand and came up with a plan to help.

To find out what happened and to hear other “Tales from HPPR” tune in to High Plains Public Radio Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from May 16-27 at 7:45 AM and 5:44 PM or listen online at hppr.org.


La Llorona: The Weeping Woman - (Urban Legend Explained) - YouTube

Friday, May 20: La Llorona, The Weeping Woman

A Mexican Folk Tale told by Helen Burton, Amarillo Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Advisory Committee and Amarillo Area  Foundation Board Member

La Llorona is a Mexican-American Folktale. The earliest documentation of the story is traced back to 1550 in Mexico City.  A typical version of this folktale is about a beautiful woman with two children. In a blind rage, she drowns her children in a river, which she immediately regrets. Unable to save them and consumed by guilt, she drowns herself as well, but is unable to enter the afterlife and is condemned to roam this earth until she finds her children. At night she wanders and weeps, crying for her children and snatching other children. Her story is told to scare children into good behavior.

To find out more about La Llorona and to hear other “Tales from HPPR” tune in to High Plains Public Radio Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from May 16-27 at 7:45 AM and 5:44 PM or listen online at hppr.org.


Windwagon Smith | Explore Tumblr Posts and Blogs | Tumgir

Monday, May 23: Windwagon Smith

A Tall Tale told by Rebel Mahieu, Art Instructor at Colby Community College, Colby, Kansas and HPPR Board of Directors Member

According to this Tall Tale, in 1853 during America’s westward migration – Windwagon Smith sailed into Westport, Missouri, with his wind-powered Conestoga Wagon. The town folk were astonished and laughed. But soon WindWagon sold them of his idea of building these land sailing wind-powered wagons to speed travel along the Santa Fe Trail. They could sail across Kansas, parts of Oklahoma and Colorado and into New Mexico in record time. No need for oxen or horses – and the wind was always there. Why it would make them rich! Except – it didn’t. What happened?

To find out what happened and to hear other “Tales from HPPR” tune in to High Plains Public Radio Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from May 16-27 at 7:45 AM and 5:44 PM or listen online at hppr.org.


Old Blue: Top Hand on the Trail | Texas Co-op Power | An Online Community  for Members of Texas Electric Cooperatives

Wednesday, May 25: Old Blue

A Legend from the Texas Panhandle told by Michael Grauer, McCasland Chair of Cowboy Culture, Curator of Cowboy Collections and Western Art, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

In 1865 there were approximately 5 million longhorn cattle in Texas in 1865. If the cowboys could drive the herds to the markets in the north, they would fetch ten times what they were worth in Texas.

The long trip of four-five months required a lead steer, one who was born with a bossy mentality. Colonel Charles Goodnight’s Old Blue was perhaps the most famous of the lead steers. A tall, gunmetal-blue steer with horns that spread wide, Old Blue took the lead position from the Goodnight’s famous JA Ranch, near Palo Duro Canyon to Dodge City, Kansas no less than eight times.  Old Blue’s horns now are housed at the Panhandle-Plains Museum.

To find out more about Old Blue and to hear other “Tales from HPPR” tune in to High Plains Public Radio Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from May 16-27 at 7:45 AM and 5:44 PM or listen online at hppr.org.


young prince talking to golden fish he just caught fishing

Friday, May 27: The Golden Fish

A Fairy Tale told by Haven Jock, Amarillo Public Library Youth Services, Amarillo, Texas.

Once upon a time there lived a king who was very ill. To cure him, the doctor needed the blood of a Golden Fish. The Prince set out to try to catch such a fish.  After months of trying, he finally caught one. But the fish was so beautiful, with eyes begging for its life. He found he could not kill it and threw it back into the sea.

To find out what happened and to hear other “Tales from HPPR” tune in to High Plains Public Radio Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from May 16-27 at 7:45 AM and 5:44 PM or listen online at hppr.org.

This tale is part of the Amarillo Public Library’s Summer Reading program “Oceans of Possibilities”, with programs every day throughout June and July. Check out your local public library for other summer reading programs.


Tales from HPPR is proudly sponsored by 
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